White Prakash - An Honorable Tea, Literally!

Posted by Nepal Tea on

Mr. Deepak Prakash Banskota was in his early twenties when he carried almost 20 kilo/bags of soil for 3 days on his back to test the home-soil. He saw how transformative tea production could be during his time at Darjeeling (read more about the story here). He came back with positive news for the village. For a place that lacked any economic output, this was a moment that marked the change we see today. 

White Prakash is dedicated to our founding father, Mr. Deepak Prakash Baskota. He spearheaded the idea of creating the first certified organic tea garden in Nepal, presently known as Kanchanjangha Tea Estate and Research Center. He might be known in Nepal by different designations such as the ex-minister of home affairs, member of the parliament and chairman of several organizations, but we remember him quite differently. For us and for the dear farmers at our garden, he is the guiding light of the organic movement, the father of cooperative, and a champion of social change. Therefore, we have named this amazing tea after him. 

It so happens that it was not just our thought, but this tea was truly honorable. Recently, White Prakash won the Bronze medal in the Global Tea Championship 2019 in the White Tea Category. We take this as not just an honor to the qualities of tea but an honor to the man without whom this tea would not have existed. Furthermore, this award is for those hardworking hands of our amazing farmers as they ensure the highest quality of tea gets served to the palates of people around the globe. 

It is truly an honor to have been a messenger of such amazing work. White Prakash is aptly named for the light Mr. Deepak Prakash has been to the tea movement in Nepal. 

Fun fact: Mr. Banskota realized that only a handful of soil was needed to test the soil when he walked all the way to India! But it was all worth it.


More on White Prakash; not from us though but from tea experts, tea connoisseurs, and tea enthusiasts. 

Score: 96/100. Beautiful silvery budsets that produce a light yellow liquor with notes of gardenia, vanilla and pie crust. Creamy and round with a long vanilla/honey finish. An outstanding white tea from Nepal.

- Tony Gebely | Tea Epicure 

The infusion is light gold in color with an aroma that is savory, floral, and nutty with dry muscatel grape notes.  The taste is floral, toasty, and lightly savory with just a hint of astringency and a long mildly floral finish. The finish was pleasantly intriguing, initially feeling dry and clean before becoming velvety and floral.

- Heather Porter | Hanamichi

Dry leaves: sweet, notes of orange blossom water and aniseed
Liquor: slightly floral and peppery on the first steep, ever so slightly astringent with notes of dried lavender and orange blossom water on the second steep.
Mouthfeel: light-bodied and flavorful, clean aftertaste lingers 
Overall Impression: it's a very unique tea, with unexpected flavor and aroma notes that I’ve never had in any other white tea before.
- Anna | The Tea Squirrel

I normally drink only black and oolong teas, but after trying this White Prakash, it will definitely be one of my additional go-to teas - especially when entertaining guests. Whites are a bit pricey most of the time, but this one, along with Nepal Teas Silver Yeti, are definitely affordable and superior white teas in my opinion. Light, yet very fragrant and pleasing to the pallet it is an exceptional drinking tea any time of the day. Give it a try!
- Gary Goodnow 

Wonderfully delicate and aromatic; excellent for three or more infusions of the same leaves.
- David W Greene

It's a beautiful tea, from the large leaves to delicate notes. I'm normally a black tea aficionado, but this white tea is now a favorite.
- Faelyn

This white tea makes a delicious cup of tea. I bought some just before the holidays and entertained my whole family with it, and they all loved it too!
- Kristine




1 comment

  • Could I please have instructions how to make the perfect cold brew White Prakash as I tasted in Chicago at Int’l Tea Festival?

    Lynda Hogan on


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